Tom Waits meets a bag of mushrooms in a crown royal bag...

Tom Waits meets a bag of mushrooms in a crown royal bag meets a peanut butter and jelly pizza meets a bulldog with a wooden leg. Concentrated type of beautiful-crazy makes this book a ride on a fiery rickshaw. It is quick-paced with a ton of information. Before you can enjoy something—another something arises. At the fertile heart of this story is a straightforward fairy tale: a boy meets a girl and they skip to a happy ending. But everything is done backwards and all is subverted. What is he building here? He marries her on the 1st meeting—he proposes with an ellipsis—he doesn’t even know her name—he reads it off her dog tag. It is just so god-darn zany and capriciously delicious. I even like when the illustrations don’t correlate with the book—slight infidelity with the text. In Chapter 3 Cornelius Wordbook is an English gentleman with a book-for-a-head and he ends up (in the illustrations) get his head offed via a guillotine, but that part isn’t mentioned in the book. May it be Prince Gobbledygook feels that way. And the vagueness of the penultimate illustration of Chapter 3 makes for different interpretations. Is a headless Cornelius Wordbook delivering his bookhead to the library? Is Prince Gobbledygook Cornelius Wordbook? Is that Prince Gobledygook? I think all these characters are reflections of the same person and we are in some sort of weird place where he is everybody. I think therefore I am reflecting too much on this. All just absolutely weird and it all somehow works. The illustrations mostly adhere to the story—that was the only differentiation (Chapter 3). The words are great and the illustrations are great—together they make for greater fiction.